Long-term Bone Mineral Density Changes in Antiretroviral-Treated HIV-Infected Individuals

Topic:

HIV Prevention

Authors:

Grant PM, Kitch D, McComsey GA, Collier A, Koletar S, Erlandson KM, Yin MT, Bartali B, Ha B, Melbourne K, Brown TT

External Link:

Link to article

We compared adjusted bone mineral density (BMD) changes between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals during the first approximately 7.5 years after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and HIV-uninfected controls. HIV-infected individuals (n = 97) had significantly greater adjusted BMD decline than controls (n = 614) during the first 96 weeks of ART. Subsequently, the rate of BMD decline slowed in HIV-infected individuals but remained greater than the rate of decline in HIV-uninfected individuals at the lumbar spine but not at the hip. In HIV-infected individuals after 96 weeks, no HIV- or treatment-related characteristic was associated with BMD loss, but lower lean body mass was associated with greater BMD loss at both lumbar spine and hip.

J Infect Dis, 2016, 214(4):607-11

Categories

CRS
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