WWH (Washington DC)

In December 2013, the Division of AIDS of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases selected Whitman-Walker Health as the only new domestic Clinical Research Site in the most recent competition for funding. WWH was thrilled to join the AIDS Clinical Trials Group and to provide its patients access to the cutting-edge, scientific work in the ACTG. Since becoming an ACTG site, WWH is proud to have enrolled nearly 150 participants into 15 distinct ACTG trials and continues to thrive and grow as a site. WWH has a long history of participating in advanced clinical research, starting in 1987 when some of the early trials on AZT for HIV treatment were conducted here. Since then, the health center’s investigators and staff have conducted over 350 studies that have included over 4,000 patients; one cohort study currently alone has over 2,500 enrolled participants. 

WWH’s research studies look at new and better ways to treat or prevent diseases in the community, like HIV, hepatitis B and C, and high cholesterol. WWH’s portfolio includes clinical trials that test how well new medications work and how safe the medications are for patients; as well as behavioral studies that look at such topics as disease prevention and medical adherence. WWH has expanded into research related to HIV cure and vaccines, and intersectionality effects on biomarkers. WWH also helped set up the first transgender women’s longitudinal cohort study in the nation.

WWH has worked closely with the National Institutes of Health and the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health on the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and multiple HIV/STI prevention projects. The health center has also collaborated with industry sponsors to evaluate all of the current therapies used to treated HIV and viral hepatitis. The effectiveness and tolerability of these medications have changed dramatically over the past 20 years. WWH and its patients have been at the forefront of contributing to research that has led to all of the currently approved single tablet regimens for HIV and the direct acting agents for hepatitis C treatment. Becoming a part of the ACTG has offered WWH the opportunity to conduct additional areas of research, including cure research and studies on more novel immunotherapies for HIV.

The WWH CRS operates from two sites in Northwest Washington, DC. Most patient visits are conducted at WWH’s site at 1525 14th Street NW, a state of the art facility that opened in May 2015. The WWH CRS Coordinator and ACTG staff offices and industry-sponsored studies are located there, as well as WWH’s main medical, dental, and behavioral health services and pharmacy. WWH’s second site, located at 1145 19th Street NW, houses our large HIV PrEP study, our SHARE/MACS Cohort Study and their staff; as well as our Data Manager offices and our blood apheresis facility, for use in ACTG and other clinical trials.

Translating research into clinical practice and bridging community efforts and scientific initiatives to combat HIV are at the center of WWH’s mission and values. The health center is thrilled to collaborate with JHU and BJMC as part of the ACTG and looks forward to making significant advancements in HIV and hepatitis research.

Clinical Trials

A5282: A Randomized, Phase II Trial to Compare an HPV...

The investigators are looking for a better way to prevent cervical cancer. This study is comparing two different methods to...

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HPTN 078: Enhancing Recruitment, Linkage to Care and...

The purpose of this study is to develop and assess the efficacy of an integrated strategy that includes feasible and scalable...

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A5354/EARLIER: Effect of Antiretroviral Treatment Initiated...

This study will include people who have very recently been infected with HIV and will start anti-HIV (antiretroviral) drugs...

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A5346: Sitagliptin for Reducing Inflammation and Immune...

The purpose of the study is to evaluate whether sitagliptin (Januvia is the brand name for sitagliptin)...

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A5207, Maintaining Options for Mothers Study (MOMS): A Phase...

A major disadvantage of giving SD NVP is the potential for maternal development of NVP resistance and additional resistance to...

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